Skip to main content

ECO 151/152 Principles of Macro/Microeconomics Korbesmeyer: Internet/Web

Search the Web

Google is not the only game in town!  Try searching by

  • Search Engines
  • Metasearch Engines  Why use a single search engine when you can use a Meta?  All web search engines are based on algorithms -- complex series of lexical orders -- when they are combined, they may actually compete/delete results from some searches. Combining results from two or more engines assures the researcher of a more complete list of informative web sites.  One disadvantage is that the special functions specific to a particular search engine can be lost with a metasearch engine.
  • Internet Directories  Directories place web sites into categories. The web sites are selected according to the policies of the group that creates the directory. Directories can lead you quickly to the best or most relevant sites on your topic. Search engines tend to return a large number of results with the most popular or best matches for your words at the top; directories return fewer but often better results. Most directories include a search feature in addition to category browsing.

Recommended Websites

Agencies & Organizations

Web Evaluation

 Evaluating Information on the Internet

 

 It is especially important to look at information found on the Internet with a critical eye.  Anyone can, and probably will, publish anything on the Internet.  Therefore, it is often difficult to tell:

  •   What kind of document you are viewing
  •   Where it came from
  •   When it was created
  •   Who authored/created it
  •   If the publication is an original, a revision, plagiarized, or altered by others
  •   If it has been reviewed by peers, an editor, a refereeing process, or by a librarian

When you plan to use information from the Internet for academic purposes, you should consider the following criteria and ask yourself the corresponding questions:

Accuracy

  •   Is the information presented accurate? 
  •   Are the facts verifiable from other sources?
  •   Is the information presented clearly, with few mechanical and grammatical errors?

Authority

  •   Who is the author of the document?
  •   Is the author the original creator of the information?
  •   Is the author an expert on the topic or a professional in the field?

Objectivity

  •   Does the material inform, explain, or persuade?
  •   Does the author have a bias?
  •  Is the author affiliated with particular organizations, institutions, or associations?  Does the organization supporting the site have a particular point of view?
  • Is the information presented fact or opinion?

Currency

  • On what date was the page created?
  • Do you need more current information?
  • Do links on the site still connect to their destinations?

Use

  • Would you quote information from this site in a college research paper?
  • Is the type of material appropriate for the assignment?
  • Does the source include a bibliography or citations that can be used for comparing or verifying information?

 

St. Louis Community College Libraries

Florissant Valley Campus Library
3400 Pershall Rd.
Ferguson, MO 63135-1408
Phone: 314-513-4514

Forest Park Campus Library
5600 Oakland
St. Louis, MO 63110-1316
Phone: 314-644-9210

Meramec Campus Library
11333 Big Bend Road
St. Louis, MO 63122-5720
Phone: 314-984-7797

Wildwood Campus Library
2645 Generations Drive
Wildwood, MO 63040-1168
Phone: 636-422-2000